The Hate U Give | Angie Thomas

14:30



'BRAVE DOESN'T MEAN YOU'RE SCARED, IT MEANS YOU GO ON EVEN THOUGH YOU'RE SCARED" - The Hate U Give 

The Hate U Give has been a highly anticipated release and once it was released, it was everywhere. On Book tube, in book stores, twitter, pretty much anywhere else you are going to see a very anticipated book release. Once I heard the synopses I was really intrigued and wanted to read it although I was slightly wary. Sometimes books are so overly anticipated it either puts me off reading them or I find myself really disappointed once I've finished it as it didn't live up to the high expectations I have built up in my head. Whilst I was really excited to start reading this book I was also slightly nervous that it would fall into one of these categories... I am pleased to tell you it did not.

The Hate U Give follows sixteen-year-old Starr who lives in a poor area of America where there are drugs and opposing gangs. However, Starr's  mother and father, an ex-gang leader, has placed her in a private school where she is one of the few black students there, to try and get her away from the dangers of her neighbourhood. When Starr is the only witness to her best friend being shot dead by a police man, she becomes caught up in seeing the reality on how people like her are treated. We follow her as she discovers what it is like to be such a key witness to such a horrific act and what she needs to do to stand up for herself and her rights.

YA books are expanding so much with what people are writing about. More and more delve into an improtant and relevant issue which we have in today's society and give messages which are so important for everyone to learn about, especially for young people. The Hate U Give deals with such a serious issue that not a lot of people are willing to shine the light on. There is so much hate in the world with the recent attacks on in the UK and we need more books that tell the story of what this hate does to people and how we can fight against it and for young people to be reading such an empowering book is really important. Sadly racism is still a huge issue when it really shouldn't. It is voices like Angie Thomas that will help to put a stop to it. 

What I also loved about this book was that not only did it have such a strong and powerful message (and convey it in such a powerful way), its' characters are so relatable and I really grew to love them. In so many ways, Starr and I have nothing in common, we live completely different lives but as a sixteen-year-old so many of her thoughts and feelings I completely understood. Like her life at school and the pressures you can feel - they might not be the same but I felt like I knew what she was feeling, which also helped to make the whole story so much more real.

There were also so many little side stories entwined into this book that added to my love for it. Reading about her friendships, boy trouble and family issues that she had made the story so realistic as I can really imagine that this happened to someone living their normal life. Which also makes it so much more shocking and emphasise that this happens in today's society.

I flew through this book reading it in two days. Once I had finished it, all I wanted to do was recommend it to everyone so they could all read it and I could talk about it with everyone. The book made me feel and an array of emotions from sad to hopeful, disgusted by our society to wishful for the few who can make a difference. Angie Thomas has created an amazing book with an even more powerful message which everyone should read.




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